Monday, March 30, 2009

Get Involved

It's probably no secret that children who have involved parents are more happy, healthy, and well-adjusted and excel at their educational and extracurricular pursuits. It can increase their cognitive development, keeps them motivated, strengthens the parent-child relationship, and has a direct positive influence on their overall academic achievement. In turn, it can also help parents achieve a positive outlook on their parenting, increase their own self confidence and self esteem, and will most likely feel more satisfied with their child's educational experience at school. But where do you get involved?

With today's busy schedules between home, work, and school, it may feel that the average family has very little quality time to offer. However, different options and levels of commitment are available to fit every parent's availability, and with some careful planning and dedication, you can make it a positive experience for both yourself and your child. First of all, discover what your child is most passionate about.

Maybe you've thought about volunteering for the school bake sale to raise money, but your child is actually more actively involved in her local Girl Scouts troop. If that's the case, then get together with the other Girl Scout parents and see what you can contribute to help the troop. Maybe you could organize a bake sale to benefit their next summer outing.

It's also important to consider what skills, talents and abilities you can bring to the table. Maybe your child's school is in desperate need of your help organizing a fundraiser, but your skills in sewing and designing might better serve the school if you were to help in making the costumes for the school play.

Remember, you want this to be a positive experience for both of you, and if your child senses that you're not happy with what you've chosen to become involved in, then they likely will not be happy as well. But the bottom line is get involved and stay involved. Children of involved parents are less likely to get into mischief, have emotional problems, or have problems in school. You benefit by connecting with and staying connected to your child. It's a win-win situation!

3 comments:

  1. Wow! What a great post and reminder to parents everywhere. Thank you.

    You’ve got one heck of a blog here. And your writing is really amazing.

    I’m what you might like to think as the very tail end of the SITS welcome wagon. While my cohorts all probably stopped by your blog in a very timely manner, I instead took a different approach. I thought I would wait a while and then swing by and say, hey, you’re still a member!

    Or maybe I’m just a big slacker who is finally getting back on the comment wagon. I’ll leave the interpretation up to you, but I urge you to seriously consider option #1! :)

    -Francesca

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  2. Great advice! I'm new to all of this, but I've been volunteering in my son's preschool every week for children to practice their reading skills with me. It is so incredibly rewarding, and my son adores that I'm the "reading mom" and it has helped encourage him to read to me as well. I couldn't agree more that our involvement is critical to the success of our children. Thanks for this post.

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